Aventura Yachting

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Northern Carian

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 Fethiye Körfezi Lycian

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Lycian Gocek to Antalya

Byzantine Kekova

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Ancient Caria

Ancient Lycia

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Myra / Demre

Myra (Greek: Μύρα) is an ancient town in Lycia, where the small town of Kale (Demre) is situated today in present day Antalya Province of Turkey. It was located on the river Myros (Demre Çay), in the fertile alluvial plain between Alaca Dağ, the Massikytos range and the Aegean Sea.

The ruins of the Lycian and Roman town are mostly covered by alluvial silts. The Acropolis on the Demre-plateau, the Roman theatre and the Roman baths (eski hamam) have been partly excavated. The semi-circular theatre was destroyed in an earthquake in 141AD, but rebuilt afterwards.

There are two necropoli of Lycian rock-cut tombs in the form of temple fronts carved into the vertical faces of cliffs at Myra: the river necropolis and the ocean necropolis. The ocean necropolis is just northwest of the theatre. The best known tomb in the river necropolis (located 1.5 km up the Demre Cayi from the theatre) is the "Lion's tomb,"also called the "Painted Tomb." When the traveller Charles Fellows saw the tombs in 1840 he found them still colourfully painted red, yellow and blue.


Andriake was the harbour of Myra in classical times, but silted up later on. The main structure there surviving to the present day is a granary built during the reign of the Roman emperor Hadrian (117–138 BC). Beside this granary is a large heap of Murex shells, evidence that Andriake had an ongoing operation for the production of purple dye.

In early Christian times, Myra was the metropolis of Lycia. The town is traditionally associated with Saint Paul, who changed ships in its harbour. Saint Nicholas of Myra was the bishop of Myra in the 4th century AD, is said to have been an ardent opponent of Arianism at the First Council of Nicaea in 325 AD, although his name does not appear among the signatories of that council. Myra became the capital of the Byzantine Eparchy of Lycia under Theodosius II, who reigned from 408 to 450.

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Roman amphitheatre - Myra

Myra masks

Rock tombs  - Myra

Emperor Hadrian and wife Sabina

St Nicholas of Myra (Santa Claus)

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